Train Mountain

Train Mountain is quickly becoming the Mecca of 7-inch, plus, model railroading. Located in the beautiful evergreen forests of southern Oregon with beautiful Mount Shasta in the distance, the setting is nearly perfect. Because of its enormous acreage, Train Mountain has almost unlimited room for expansion. Every Live Steam railroading enthusiast owes it to themselves to become a member of this excellent facility.

As reported in the Jan/Feb 2001 issue of Live Steam magazine, Train Mountain was one of the host sites of the International Brotherhood of Live Steamers 2000 Meet. It was an event that will not soon be forgotten.

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Here is Dave Giles of New Zealand with his Shay, coming into Train Mountain's main switchyard to pick up some passenger cars. Dave can easily convert his Shay to run on either 7-inch or 7-inch tracks.

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The pictures are a bit out of order, here; but, the owner of Train Mountain should be accorded the honor of having his picture near the top. Quentin Breen, a gracious man, won't mind that a picture of an overseas visitor is placed even higher on the page.

Quentin Breen at the throttle of his "show train" locomotive, after the "mile long" group photograph, leading the "grand parade" past Central Station.

No, I don't think Quentin is buttoning his shirt. He's probably on the radio, speaking to the dispatcher or one of his staff.

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Here you see one mile of 7-inch trains assembled for the group photograph taken by Joe Rice and featured on the cover of the Jan/Feb 2000 issue of Live Steam magazine.

At the front you can see Dennis Weaver's T-Boilered Shay. Alongside is Marie Weaver's Galloping Goose. What about those plush seats!?!

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Art Crisp, Train Mountain Track Superintendent, follows Quentin in the Grand Parade.

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Cal Tinkham and his 4-6-0, a stove-oil burner.

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Harry Haas's masterpiece. A truly remarkable rendition of the prototype.

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Clifford Plumpton's "Pacific" steamer on a Crisp Yard steaming bay. Cliff and his father-in-law built this engine in order to pass the maching skils down to Cliff. This propane-burner is a beauty.

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Ed Rehburg's beautiful CP-173 "American" type locomotive. He built it from castings made from Walt Disney's patterns for the Lily Belle. Ed hard-carved the pilot out of wood.

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Chuck Hackett and his Northern, a class act. The Northern is steaming here with a couple of plugged flues; after all, the boiler is 32 years old. After Chuck got back to Nebraska he shipped the boiler off to have a new one built. Here's Chuck's story.

You might also find this interesting.

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Click here to see Chuck close-up 53k (Use your browser's "back" feature to return to this page.)

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The 24 steaming bays of Crisp yard bustle with activity from early morning to late at night during IBLS 2000.

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Craig Craddock's breathtaking Daylight, a real head-turner. The interior lighting of the passenger cars delighted bystanders on its nightime runs. Impressive.

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Steaming on to the Ellingson turntable.

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This jolly bunch hails from Australia: Left to right, they are Eric Evans, Helmut Ecker, Barry Glover, and Mark Robinson. Do the names Eric Evans and Barry Glover sound familiar to you? Check your copy of the Australian Miniature Boiler Safety Code and you'll find them.

I happened to be watching the activity around the Ellinson turntable when I picked up on their Aussie accent. One thing led to another and we had a jolly good time together. My main disappointment of the whole Train Mountain experience was arranging for them to get a train ride, but then it fell through when the engineer couldn't get the fire started in his boiler.

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The Ellingson turntable looks forlorn and lonely after all the IBLS activity is over and the guests left for further adventures in their ramble.

As an item interest I might add that during IBLS 2000 one could see a circular array of surveyor's stakes bordered by the Train Mountain entrance, Six Acre Campground, and the back shop. The area covered was roughly the size of the Ellingson turntable. It's the site of the new roundhouse. By-the-way all the roundhouse bays have already been leased!

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These pages designed by Orrin B. Iseminger
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Revised -- 1/17/07