Puget Sound Antique Power and
Machinery Association

The Puget Sound Antique Power and Machinery Association has one of the cleanest, prettiest sites in the country for putting on a show. They stage their popular tractor pull in a natural ampitheater, surrounded by trees that offer enough shade for all to enjoy. The temperature rarely gets out of the comfortable range and the humidity and such pests as mosquitoes are notable only because of their complete absense. The high trees all around ensure complete protection from wind. It is the closest thing there is to a perfect show ground.

The surrounding community of Lynden, Washington consists of neat-as-a-pin dairy farms operated by industrious people of Dutch extraction. The picturesque town is as pretty, neat and clean as any you'll find in the USA.

The annual show features a mix of a variety of tractors, steam powered sawmill, threshing demonstration, trucks, engines, tractor pull, and permanent IC and steam engine displays. There's plenty to see and enjoy.

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Here is one of the cleverest models around. It is a 2/3rds scale Waterloo Boy built by Ted Turner of Ted's Model Tractors from British Columbia. Its two-cylinder power comes from a Subaru automobile engine cut in half! The convincing-looking oilers on top of the engine duplicate the appearance of a Waterloo engine; they are gasoline sediment bowls mounted upside-down!

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This 2/3rds scale John Deere AR is another masterpiece from the hands of Ted Turner. The incredibly convincing radiator casting and the front axle look "factory." Ted says they're all built-up from steel stock. He cut out the letters then blended them them in with auto body filler.

Ted hauls these gems on a perfect scale model Diamond T cab-over. He says it will do 70 mph on the freeway.

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This (200 h.p.?) two-cylinder Western Machinery engine provided great sound effects during the 2000 show. The operators ran it on propane, but it seemed as if they couldn't quite get a handle on controlling the mix. The engine seemed to either be accelerating and letting out a very loud exhaust note, or, coasting. Note that it takes very little fuel-air mix to keep an engine--even one of this size--idling along. I've run a 25 h.p. Superior with the air completely choked off. Air leaks, alone, plus a barely cracked open -inch propane valve, were more than enough to keep the engine running at idle speed.

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We found this cute-as-a-bug 1909 Petter 1 h.p. over by the sawmill, orphaned from the main engine display area.

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The mainline machinery companies did not "invent" the huge tractors you see, today. It's quite the reverse. They did not offer the size and horsepower required in the vast expanses of Montana; so, farmers relied upon their own ingenuity to come up with what they needed. Here is a great example of that inventiveness. It is two John Deere Model R tractors with their front wheels removed, then connected in tandem, front end to drawbar. Hydraulic cylinders provide articulated steering as well as remote operation of the second tractor's clutch. Yes, this is a Montana tractor.

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This whimsical rendition of a double Farmall "A" made its appearance at the 1996 show.

When you think about it, the challenge of connecting two differentials side-by-side is a big one.

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Here's another tongue-in-cheek rig, a Model B Allis Chalmers with dual rear wheels. I'll have to admit that if all four rear wheels are filled with ballast, the little rascal should have good traction! 1996

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These pages designed by Orrin B. Iseminger

Copyright © 2001, Orrin B. Iseminger
Revised -- 1/18/01